tight-roped

The tightrope between the cliffs of childhood and adulthood...I'm old enough and young enough. I'm too old and too young. I get marshmallow on my face when we make smores; when drunk I spill beer on my legs. Some nights I sleep with a stuffed animal in my bed; some nights I fuck him in it. I'm engaged to be married; I haven't yet left home.
~ Friday, August 29 ~
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Such is life: You either ride the gravy train or you accidentally eat it.

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If you were happy every day of your life you wouldn’t be a human being. You’d be a game-show host.
— Winona Ryder in Heathers (via glamour)

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psychotherapy:

Psychotherapist and author Adam Phillips on Pleasure & Frustration:

One of the obstacles is the demand that we be happy and enjoy your lives. I think it’s a huge distraction and it’s very undermining, I think. In the old days, whenever that was, there was an internal injunction to be good. Now the injunction is to be happy or to be enjoying yourself. And the reason this is a distraction is because life is also painful…in other words—and it’s a very simple thing and it’s very obvious and this starts in childhood—which is that if somebody can satisfy you, they can also frustrate you. This is ineluctable. It’s structural. It’s never going to change. This means that everybody has to deal with ambivalence—they’re going to have to deal with the fact that they love and hate the person they love and hate.

What we’re continuously being sold are possibilities for pleasure, in one way or another, as though all we want to do is get rid of the pain and increase the pleasure. I think this is a very impoverished view of what a life is, even though every life must involve trying to do something with the pain and having the pleasure. But there’s a difference between evacuating pain and frustration, and modifying it. And what we’re starved of now is frustration.

It’s as though we’re phobic of frustration, so the moment there is a feeling of frustration, it’s got to be filled with something. It’s a bit like the mother who overfeeds her child. She does that to stop the child from having appetite, because the appetite is so frightening. Now it seems to me there’s an attempt to foreclose appetite, to foreclose people’s capacity to think about what is really missing in their lives, what they might want and what they might do about getting it. Fantasies of satisfaction are saboteurs of pleasure.” 


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~ Monday, August 25 ~
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We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.
— Maya Angelou (via glamour)

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~ Saturday, August 23 ~
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But the law of loving others could not be discovered by reason, because it is unreasonable.
— Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (via bibliophilebunny)

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~ Monday, August 18 ~
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In my view a writer is a writer because even when there is no hope, even when nothing you do shows any sign of promise, you keep writing anyway.

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The capital, like most Chinese cities nowadays, has been changing fast—the biggest local map publisher updates its diagrams every three months, to keep pace with development. But the layout of my neighborhood has remained more or less the same for centuries.
Peter Hessler writes in his 2006 story on life in a Beijing alleyway. (via newyorker)

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~ Sunday, August 17 ~
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There are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation.
Tags: Rebecca Mead read reading books literature
~ Thursday, August 14 ~
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Forever is composed of nows
— Emily Dickinson (via fxck-me-sideways)

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You’re only given one little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it.

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The Genius of Robin Williams in “Aladdin”

newyorker:

image

Ian Crouch reflects on what he considers to be the actor’s most iconic performance:

“Thanks to Williams’s generosity and full-throttle sincerity as a performer, the jokes that went over the kids’ heads never felt exclusionary or as if they had been included at our expense. Instead, they were a warm and thrilling invitation to aspire toward joining the adult table, where Williams would put you at ease by poking you under the table and making fart noises.”


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likeafieldmouse:

HiroshigeNew Year’s Eve Foxfires at the Changing Tree, Ōji (1857) 


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